PRIMORIS      Contacts      FAQs      INSTICC Portal
 

Keynote Lectures

The Role of Modeling and Simulation in Coordination of Health Care
Bernard P.Zeigler, University of Arizona, United States

Framing the Foundations of Computing using Computer Simulation
Paul Fishwick, University of Texas at Dallas, United States

Modelling as a Way in Design of Novel Algorithms in Computational Intelligence
Helena Szczerbicka, Universität Hannover, Germany

 

The Role of Modeling and Simulation in Coordination of Health Care

Bernard P.Zeigler
University of Arizona
United States
 

Brief Bio
Bernard P Zeigler is Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona and Adjunct Research Professor in the C4I Center at George Mason University. He is internationally known for his seminal contributions in modeling and simulation theory and has published several books including “Theory of Modeling and Simulation” and “Modeling & Simulation-based Data Engineering: Introducing Pragmatics into Ontologies for Net-Centric Information Exchange“. He was named Fellow of the IEEE for the Discrete Event System Specification (DEVS) formalism that he invented in 1976. Among numerous positions held with the Society for Modeling and Simulation International (SCS) he served as President and was inducted into its Hall of Fame. He is currently Chief Scientist with RTSync Corp., a developer of the MS4 modeling and simulation software based on DEVS. Zeigler’s research has been funded by a variety of sponsors including National Science Foundation (NSF), Defense Advanced Reseach Projects Agency, US Air Force Research Laboratory among others. . Currently, Zeigler is leading a project for the NSF and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the developing a simulation model for the national healthcare system. For more information see the Wikipedia entry on Bernard P Zeigler.


Abstract

US healthcare, the most expensive in the world, has been diagnosed as an assemblage of uncoordinated component subsystems embedded in a market economy that promotes independent pricing with few points of global control over delivered quality of care and cost.  In this talk, we report on a project to develop a modeling and simulation methodology and tools to capture the existing state of, and re-engineer, such a system of systems to increase quality of care and reduce cost. A useful abstraction comprehends the system as an interaction of individual patients, a variety of care providers, a set of payers, and a billing system that records patient-provider transactions and enables payer-provider fee-for-service transactions.  Stimulated by the Affordable Care Act and other initiatives, efforts are underway to increase the level of information technology (IT) to improve patient record keeping and portability as well as the move to price services based on performance rather than amount provided. Yet such an IT infrastructure  by itself will not provide  significantly greater coordination since it does not provide transparency into the threads of transactions that represent patient treatments, their outcomes, and total costs.
In this talk, we discuss the Pathways Care Coordination model,  a construct that enforces threaded distributed tracking of individual patients experiencing certain pathways of intervention, thereby supporting coordination of care and fee for performance based on end-to-end outcomes.  As an essential byproduct, the Pathway concept also opens up possibilities for system level metrics that enable more coherent visualization of behavior than previously possible, therefore greater process control and improvement re-engineering, We discuss the associated concepts, their implementation in the MS4 Modeling and Simulation Environment, and the application to a successful implementation of Pathways model in a local scale.  We close with comments on how the environment and tools can play a role in the evolution of the Pathways model  as it is scaled up to state and national levels.



 

 

Framing the Foundations of Computing using Computer Simulation

Paul Fishwick
University of Texas at Dallas
United States
 

Brief Bio
Paul Fishwick is Distinguished Chair of Arts and Technology and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas. He began employment working at Newport News Shipbuilding and at NASA Langley Research Center. Fishwick obtained the PhD in Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by three academic appointments in Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the University of Florida. Fishwick has authored and edited books on modeling and simulation and aesthetic computing, and has over 200 technical publications. He serves on all editorial boards of simulation-related journals such as ACM Transactions on Modeling and Simulation, where he started as a founding area editor of modeling methodology in 1990. He chaired the Winter Simulation Conference in 2000, and currently serves as Chair of ACM SIGSIM. He directs the Creative Automata Laboratory, where his most recent research is human-model interaction for education and communication.


Abstract
Modeling is an enterprise that is present in all academic disciplines, and it is a topic native to the simulation field in cases where the model captures the dynamical essence of phenomena. Computing is a large field, where practitioners write programs to process data, and integrate information. We propose an approach to learning computing through, not only the execution of a simulation, but also through the design of simulation models. These models serve as machines which operate to yield results identical to those of written programs. Model constructions arise from an interdisciplinary connection between systems thinking, computing, and design as practiced in the arts. The result of this collaboration is a set of creative models that engage and inspire students to learn computing. I will illustrate this practice with several examples, and cover challenges with this pedagogical approach.



 

 

Modelling as a Way in Design of Novel Algorithms in Computational Intelligence

Helena Szczerbicka
Universität Hannover
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Helena Szczerbicka is a full professor at the Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany. Her research interests are in the area of simulation, modeling with stochastic Petri Nets, nature based computational methods and sensor networks. She is a co-author of over 100 papers. Since 2010 she is a vice President of the Society of Computer Simulation International (SCS). In 2011 she was awarded with the Distinguished Service Award from the SCS.


Abstract
There has been a growing interest in recent years in development of computational intelligence methodologies that relate to nature-inspired computational methodologies and approaches to address complex real-world problems to which traditional approaches, are ineffective or infeasible. The essential to development of novel algorithms is modeling the phenomena of the nature in that way that they can be applied to solving technical problems Artificial Immune Systems are one of the recent methodologies in computational intelligence. AIS can be defined as computational systems inspired by theoretical immunology, observed immune functions, principles and mechanisms in order to solve problems. In the talk I will give an overview about the role of Modelling in Artificial Immune Systems and how we are using them for anomaly detection and protecting ad-hoc networks from attacks.



footer